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1. Africa Counts: Number and Pattern and African Culture (external link)
Abstract: This fascinating study of mathematical thinking among Saharan African peoples covers counting in words and in gestures; measuring time, distance, weight, and other quantities; number systems; patterns in music, poetry, art, and architecture; number magic and taboos, and much more. African games such as mankala and elaborate versions of tic-tac-toe show how complex this thinking can be. An invaluable resource for those interested in African cultures and multiculturalism, this third edition includes an introduction covering two decades of new research in the ethnomathematics of Africa.
Resource Type: Book



2. African Fractals: Modern Computing and Indigenous Design (external link)
Abstract: Drawing on interviews with African designers, artists, and scientists, Ron Eglash investigates fractals in African architecture, traditional hairstyling, textiles, sculpture, painting, carving, metalwork, religion, games, practical craft, quantitative technologies, and symbolic systems. He also examines the political and social implications of the existence of African fractal geometry. His book makes a unique contribution to the study of mathematics, African culture, anthropology, and computer simulations.
Resource Type: Book



3. Being Black, Living in The Red (external link)
Abstract: Being Black, Living in the Red demonstrates that many differences between blacks and whites stem not from race but from economic inequalities that have accumulated over the course of American history. Property ownership--as measured by net worth--reflects this legacy of economic oppression. The racial discrepancy in wealth holdings leads to advantages for whites in the form of better schools, more desirable residences, higher wages, and more opportunities to save, invest, and thereby further their economic advantages.
Resource Type: Book



4. Black Wealth/White Wealth: A New perspective on racial inequality (external link)
Abstract: The award-winning Black Wealth/White Wealth offers a powerful portrait of racial inequality based on an analysis of private wealth. Melvin Oliver and Thomas Shapiro analyze wealth--total assets and debts rather than income alone--to uncover deep and persistent racial inequality in America, and they show how public policies fail to redress the problem. Compelling and informative, Black Wealth/White Wealth is pioneering research. It is a powerful counterpoint to arguments against affirmative action and a direct challenge to our present social welfare policies.
Resource Type: Book



5. Bringing the World into the Math Class (external link)
Abstract: The Multicultural Math Classroom inspires cooperation, creativity, and critical thinking. This book is filled with many quality teaching ideas that will help teachers add new multicultural dimensions to their mathematics teaching.
Resource Type: Book



6. Changing The Faces of Mathematics – Perspectives on African Americans (external link)
Abstract: African American students have not been given commensurate opportunities to succeed in mathematics education. This critical look at successful and unsuccessful teaching practices related to African American students explores the perspectives of these students, specific instructional techniques, integrating culture into the classroom, and where to go from here. Case studies describe efforts that have proved successful and offer suggestions for other institutions to implement.
Resource Type: Book



7. Changing The Faces of Mathematics – Perspectives on Latinos (external link)
Abstract: The first publication of its kind, this book was published by a professional mathematics association that focuses exclusively on Latinos and it was written by Latinos. It presents articles in five parts: socioeducational issues, language issues, teaching-learning aids, staff development, and intervention programs.
Resource Type: Book



8. Education for Critical Consciousness (external link)
Abstract: No description available
Resource Type: Book



9. Equity in Mathematics Education (external link)
Abstract: From the Introduction: "Research and intervention over the past three decades have greatly increased our understanding of the relationship between gender and participation in mathematics education..."
Resource Type: Book



10. Ethnomathematics. A Multicultural View of Mathematical Ideas (external link)
Abstract: The primary cultures investigated are the Inuit, Navajo, and Iroquois of North America; the Incas, the Malejula, Warlpiri, Maori, and Caroline Islanders of the Pacific; and the Tshokwe, Bushoong, and Kpelle of Africa. Since the vast majority of potential readers have never heard of most of these cultures, reading the book has value as a simple exercise in horizon expanding. In all cases the level of mathematics is not deep, but some exposure to the particular concept is essential.
Resource Type: Book



11. Ethnomathematics: Challenging Eurocentrism in Mathematics Education (external link)
Abstract: his collection brings together classic, previously-published articles and new research to present the emerging field of ethnomathematics from a critical perspective, challenging particular ways in which Eurocentrism permeates mathematics education. The book offers a diversity of ethnomathematics perspectives that develop both theoretical and practical issues from various disciplines including mathematics, mathematics education, history, anthropology, cognitive psychology, feminist studies, and African studies written by authors from Brazil, England, Australia, Mozambique, Palestine, Belgium, and the United States.
Resource Type: Book



12. How Much is a Million (external link)
Abstract: Children are often intrigued by or confused about (sometimes both) very large numbers. Here Schwartz uses concepts that are simple to help readers conceptualize astronomical numbers like a million, billion, and trillion.
Resource Type: Book



13. Insights into Teaching Mathematics (external link)
Abstract: Providing essential guidance and background information about teaching mathematics, this book is intended particularly for teachers who do not regard themselves as specialists in mathematics. It deals with issues of learning and teaching, including the delivery of content and the place of problems and investigations.
Resource Type: Book



14. Integrating Children’s Literature and Mathematics in the Classroom (external link)
Abstract: Illustrating how children's literature can be used to communicate mathematical concepts, this book is the first ever to take a serious look at the philosophical and pedagogical assumptions underlying the movement to integrate the teaching of mathematics and children's literature.
Resource Type: Book



15. Math Adventures: Amazing Activities to Explore Multicultural Roots (external link)
Abstract: This book describes various multicultural math activities that can be used to supplement other projects and units, or to stand alone as a series of fun and socially aware activities.
Resource Type: Book



16. Math and Media: Bias Busters (external link)
Abstract: This 208-page booklet includes creative teaching ideas, compelling narratives,and hands-on examples of ways teachers can promote values of community, justice,and equality — and build academic skills.
Resource Type: Book



17. Math and Science Across Cultures: Activities and Investigations from the Exploratorium (external link)
Abstract: Too often, the study of science, math, and technology is limited to the major successes of the Western world. Yet people all over the world have observed and explored nature and developed technologies to help them in their everyday lives. This book is designed to help teachers, parents, and youth-group leaders use hands-on activities to explore the math and science of different cultural traditions, and to make these subjects more relevant and approachable for children of all backgrounds.
Resource Type: Book



18. Mathematics and Democracy: The Case for Quantitative Literacy (external link)
Abstract: The National Council on Education and the Disciplines prepared this book with executive editor Lynn Steen. A Design Team of 16 contributors looked into the meaning of numeracy in contemporary society.
Resource Type: Book



19. Mathematics of the Incas (external link)
Abstract: Unique, thought-provoking study discusses quipu, an accounting system employing knotted, colored cords, used by Incas to transmit information. Cultural context, mathematics involved, quipu-maker in Inca society—even how to make a quipu. Fascinating for anthropologists, ethnologists, students, general readers. Over 125 photos and illustrations.
Resource Type: Book



20. More Math Games and Activities from Around the World (external link)
Abstract: Presents games and other activities from different countries and cultures that teach a variety of basic mathematical concepts.
Resource Type: Book



21. Multicultural and Gender Equity in the Mathematics Classroom (external link)
Abstract: upporting the premise that no amount of good will can succeed in replacing the present-day inequitable practices unless educators develop an alternative set of successful practices and a supporting body of technical knowledge, this book present discussions of issues and highlights those practices that show particularly interesting insights into the problems of equity. Its readings will challenge you to find multiple ways of looking at multicultural and gender issues.
Resource Type: Book



22. Multicultural Mathematics. Teaching Mathematics from a Global Perspective (external link)
Abstract: Mathematics is an international language and field of study that knows no barriers between race, culture, or creed. This pioneering book was one of the first to explore ways of helping schoolchildren understand the universality of mathematics, and at the same time making it a more enjoyable, relevant, and rewarding enterprise.
Resource Type: Book



23. Multicultural Mathematics: One Road to the Goal of Mathematics for All (external link)
Abstract: No description available
Resource Type: Book



24. Native American Mathematics (external link)
Abstract: Spanning time from the prehistoric to the present, the thirteen essays in this volume attest to the variety of mathematical development present in the Americas. The data are drawn from cultures as diverse as the Ojibway, the Inuit (Eskimo), and the Nootka in the north; the Chumash of Southern California; the Aztec and the Maya in Mesoamerica; and the Inca and Jibaro of South America.
Resource Type: Book



25. Nickel and Dimed; On (Not) Getting By in America (external link)
Abstract: With some 12 million women being pushed into the labor market by welfare reform, she decided to do some good old-fashioned journalism and find out just how they were going to survive on the wages of the unskilled--at $6 to $7 an hour, only half of what is considered a living wage. So she did what millions of Americans do, she looked for a job and a place to live, worked that job, and tried to make ends meet.
Resource Type: Book



26. No-Nonsense Guide to The Arms Trade (external link)
Abstract: This disturbing book names the players in the arms trade and charts the impact that it has had on war, human rights, and development. The financial and trade mechanisms that permit the arms trade to continue are revealed, amid sordid tales of bribery and corruption
Resource Type: Book



27. Oral Storytelling and Teaching Mathematics (external link)
Abstract: This book uses oral storytelling as a means of teaching algorithms and problem solving. Its presentation of a collaborative teaching model that can be generalized to all mathematics teaching, its presentation of a new perspective on problem solving, enhancing the currently popular approach, and its insights into multicultural mathematics all provide a wealth of knowledge for pre-service and in-service classroom teachers as well as mathematics education instructors.
Resource Type: Book



28. Pedagogy of the Oppressed (external link)
Abstract: Unity and organization can enable them to change their weakness into a transforming force with which they can re-create the world and make it more human." This book is an excellent work providing prescriptive evidence about how the oppressed might go about creating their own reality to overcome oppression, seizing education, true education, as a path to freedom.
Resource Type: Book



29. Percent as a Tool For Social Justice (external link)
Abstract: From a fantastic book entitled: "Rethinking Our Classrooms, Volume 2" about teaching for Equity and Justice
Resource Type: Book



30. Principals and Standards for School Mathematics (external link)
Abstract: The nationally agreed upon standards for mathematics from elementary to high-school level classes
Resource Type: Book



31. Prisoners Once Removed (external link)
Abstract: Little research has been done on the impact of incarceration on American family life. In this book, the authors explore this important issue from both physchological and financial perspectives.
Resource Type: Book



32. Radical Equations (external link)
Abstract: Drawing its inspiration from the civil rights movement's organizing tactics, the first part of this book is devoted to detailing how black Americans undid the white choke hold on Southern politics. In part two, Moses shows how the same grassroots organizing can be applied to make change in the classroom. He also explains why the project's success rate is so much higher than that of traditional math programs. An important step forward in math pedagogy and a provocative field manual, this book is a radical equation indeed.
Resource Type: Book



33. Reading And Writing The World With Mathematics: Teaching And Learning For Social Justice In An Urban, Latino/a School (external link)
Abstract: This book argues that mathematics education should prepare students to investigate and critique injustice, and to challenge, in words and actions, oppressive structures and acts. Based on teacher-research, the book provides a theoretical framework and practical examples for how mathematics educators can connect schooling to a larger sociopolitical context and concretely teach mathematics for social justice.
Resource Type: Book



34. Real World Algebra (external link)
Abstract: Just as English can be translated into other languages, word problems can be "translated" into the math language of algebra and easily solved. Real World Algebra explains this process in an easy to understand format using cartoons and drawings. This makes self-learning easy for both the student and any teacher who never did quite understand algebra
Resource Type: Book



35. Relearning Mathematics: A Different Third R - Radical Maths (external link)
Abstract: Frankenstein's mathematics textbook differs a great deal from traditional mathematics texts since it includes not only mathematical content but also approaches to learning mathematics, a social and political context for learning mathematics, and numerous historical insights. The style of the book provides strong support for the idea that mathematics is a human endeavor and mathematics can be a powerful tool for all people. The mathematical topics included integers, rational numbers, numerical operations, and variables.
Resource Type: Book



36. Rethinking Globalization (external link)
Abstract: This comprehensive 402-page book from Rethinking Schools helps teachers raise critical issues with students in grades 4 - 12 about the increasing globalization of the world's economies and infrastructures, and the many different impacts this trend has on our planet and those who live here
Resource Type: Book



37. Rethinking Mathematics: Teaching Social Justice By the Numbers (external link)
Abstract: This unique collection of more than 30 articles shows teachers how to weave social-justice principles throughout the math curriculum, and how to integrate social-justice math into other curricular areas as well.
Resource Type: Book



38. Sociocultural Research on Mathematics (external link)
Abstract: No description available
Resource Type: Book



39. Teachers As Cultural Workers: Letters to Those Who Dare Teach (external link)
Abstract: No description available
Resource Type: Book



40. Teaching Economics as if People Mattered (external link)
Abstract: Field-tested by a team of high school teachers, this innovative economics curriculum looks at the human implications of economic policies. These 21 lesson plans are designed to stimulate dialogue and encourage active student participation in the high school classroom. Also suitable for adult audiences and self study.
Resource Type: Book



41. Teaching Mathematics in a Multilingual (external link)
Abstract: Increasingly, teachers all over the world are grappling on a daily basis with the fact of multilingual classrooms. In this book, Jill Adler captures three inter-related dilemmas that lie at the heart of teaching mathematics in multilingual classrooms. Adler's identification and naming of the dilemma of code-switching, the dilemma of mediation, and the dilemma of transparency, arise from exploring the realities of actual classrooms, and are shaped by a perspective of teaching as a social practice.
Resource Type: Book



42. The Color of Wealth: The Story Behind the Racial Wealth Divide (external link)
Abstract: Why does the median family of color have less than a dime for every white dollar? The Color of Wealth exposes how people of color have been barred from government wealth-building programs benefiting white Americans. This uniquely multicultural economic history covers the asset-building stories of Native Americans, Latinos, African Americans, Asian Americans, and European Americans.
Resource Type: Book



43. The Crest of the Peacock (external link)
Abstract: From the Ishango Bone of central Africa and the Inca quipu of South America to the dawn of modern mathematics, The Crest of the Peacock makes it clear that human beings everywhere have been capable of advanced and innovative mathematical thinking. George Gheverghese Joseph takes us on a breathtaking multicultural tour of the roots and shoots of non-European mathematics.
Resource Type: Book



44. The Equity Equation: Fostering the Advancement of Women in the Sciences, Mathematics, and Engineering (external link)
Abstract: The Equity Equation presents to findings and recommandations of the foremost experts on research and practice concerning women in science, engineering, and mathematics. It addresses issues facing women in the scientific disciplines, including: involvement in education and careers as it relates to diversity, along lies of race, class, sexual orientation, physical and learning disability, and age; institutional attitudes; barriers to success at the career stage, and more.
Resource Type: Book



45. The Field Guide to the Global Economy (external link)
Abstract: An eye-opening, at-a-glance guide to the myths and realities of the international economy. Highly illustrated with charts, graphs, and political cartoons, The Field Guide to the Global Economy makes the international economy comprehensible for everyone and reveals the harmful effects of corporate-driven globalization.
Resource Type: Book



46. The Gay and Lesbian Atlas (external link)
Abstract: Drawing on the most recent data from the U.S. Census, this groundbreaking work offers a detailed geographic and demographic portrait of gay and lesbian families in all 50 states plus the top 25 U.S. metropolitan areas. These results, presented in more than 250 full-color maps and charts, will both confirm and challenge anecdotal information about the spatial distribution and demographic characteristics of this community.
Resource Type: Book



47. The Politics of Education : Culture, Power and Liberation (external link)
Abstract: Constitutes the voice of a great teacher who has managed to replace the melancholic and despairing discourse of the post-modern Left with possibility and human compassion. –Educational Theory
Resource Type: Book



48. The State of Working America (external link)
Abstract: "If you want to know what happened to the economic well-being of the average American in the past decade or so, this is the book for you. It should be required reading for Americans of all political persuasions." —Richard Freeman, Harvard University
Resource Type: Book



49. The Water Atlast: A Unique Visual Analysis of the World's Most Critical Resource (external link)
Abstract: With a range of maps of startling clarity and richness of detail, The Water Atlas brings together the latest findings to show water distribution worldwide, the real cost of use in water-rich countries, and the dangers of a future where privatization and profit dictate availability.
Resource Type: Book



50. The Wealth Inequality Reader (external link)
Abstract: Twenty-five substantive, readable essays explore the hidden vector of wealth inequality: its causes, consequences, and strategies for change. Plus: an illustrated overview offers the latest statistics on wealth inequality in a series of one-page snapshots. The essential reader on wealth inequality, this book is a must-have for both the activist and the scholar.
Resource Type: Book



51. The Working Poor (external link)
Abstract: In The Working Poor, David Shipler examines the lives and societal forces surrounding those Americans who still live in poverty despite working full time. While many are mired in these conditions by their own poor choices, many are forced to this level by events they cannot control. Shipler combines both the larger arena of poverty in America with individual stories of those who will never make it out and those who manage to succeed.
Resource Type: Book



52. Ultimate Field Guide to the U.S. Economy: A Compact and Irreverent Guide to Economic Life in America (external link)
Resource Type: Book



53. Which Way Social Justice in Mathematics Education? (external link)
Abstract: This contributed volume explores equity and social justice within the field of mathematics education. For example, in a chapter on Peru, social justice does not just encompass gender, but also inequalities in opportunities to learn, such as problems of resources, living and social conditions, communal demands and language needs.
Resource Type: Book




Copyright © 2007 RadicalMath
  

How-To Guide
The "Guide for Integrating Issues of Social and Economic Justice into Mathematics Classrooms and Curriculum" has been updated. Download.

K. Wayne Yang
2007 Panelist
Assistant Professor of Ethnic Studies
UCSD
Co-Founder
East Oakland Community High School